188 
227

Description

Taking their name from short poems that were literary exercises in Elizabethan England and much cited by Shakespeare, posies were commonplace sentiments often inscribed in rings. The present motto is recorded on other rings and also exists with variants, such as "In love abide till death devide" and "In love abide till death divide" (see Evans, 1931, p. 58).  Manuscript repertories of posies exist from the late sixteenth century on and the posy ring gradually went out of fashion only at the end of the eighteenth century.  Unlike black letters rings, posy rings included the inscription "always next to the finger, not to be seen of him that holdeth thee by the hand."

The plain hoop, flat on the interior and rounded on the exterior, is engraved on the inside with the inscription "In love abide till death deuide" in italics, followed by an unidentified maker's mark.

Literature: 

For comparison see the British Museum (a gold posy ring engraved with the same motto, adorned with a bezel set with a ruby in an oval setting, published in Evans, 1931, p. 58 and British Museum registration number: AF.1293; a gold posy ring with the motto "In love abide till death devide," engraved with the initials "S" and "E" from the husband and wife as well as an unidentified maker's mark, published in Evans, 1931, p. 58 and British Museum registration number AF.1295; another posy ring with the motto "In loue abide till death divide", published in Evans, 1931, p. 58 and British Museum registration number AF.1294).

R-351-2

Please send me further information about this work.

Please fill in all fields.
Thank you, your inquiry has been received.